History of the Philippines

The Philippines has a rich and multi-hued history.

Since the the olden times, the country engaged extensive trade with leading trading countries within the Asian economic sphere like India, China and Japan through barter, past modes of trade exchanges and direct vending.

 

In Philippine history, the present Filipino race came from different migrants of Malay descent from different parts of Asia who crossed the “ice bridges” during the last phases of the Ice Age and into the different plains of the Philippine Islands.

They were mostly animal hunters and gatherers. Little is known after these numerous treks into the Philippine peninsula until Ferdinand Magellan of Spain “rediscovered” the country and claimed it for Spain during the year 1521.

The Philippines under Spanish Colonial Rule

The Philippines was a prized territory (the sole spanish colony in Asia at that time) during Spain’s reign because of the country’s rich and diverse produce of spices. Miguel Lopez de Legaspi, in 1565, made the first permanent Spanish settlement in Cebu. The country’s colonial administration was then transferred to Manila during 1571 in which Spain’s authority was exercised. In the rural areas, the parish priests (friars) are the ones left as the representation of spanish authority.

Much of the Philippines’ traditions bear the resemblances of Spanish traditions and customs which include, cockfighting, classical music in western forms and, the most significant of all, the Christian religion. The Philippines is considered to be a Christian country in terms of number of followers to population ratio.

During the advent of the 19th century, a new form of social consciousness emerged from the Filipino people’s minds resulting from demands for reform in the different parts of the country. This change of perspective was sparked by the different writings of Dr. Jose Rizal and other foremost Filipino intellectuals and leaders which castigated Spain’s inefficiences and abuse in its rule. This led to the failed Filipino revolution against Spain in the late 1890s.

American Rule

Spain subsequently ceded the Philippines to the United States (see Spanish-American War) during the latter part of the 19th century. Thenafter, Emilio Aguinaldo, the first Philippine president led a new war against the new rulers. However, his efforts soon resulted to disappointment. For more than 10 years, the Philippines became a colony for the United States. Some improvements in the country resulted from US colonization of the Philippines, especially the education system.

Plans were made to grant the Philippines its independene. However, the World War in the Pacific brought upon by the Japanese Empire cause the demise of these plans. After World War II ended, territorial independence was soon granted to the Filipino people (see Philippine Independence).

Life After World War II

The Philippines paid heavily in death and destruction when the Japanese forces occupied the country from 1942 to 1945 during World War II’s history. Manila was plundered, and much of it was destroyed. Postwar reconstruction was complicated by deep splits in Philippine society. Social and economic inequalities had gone largely uncorrected – the country was plagued by problems of land tenancy, absentee ownership, and unequal taxation. Moreover, the nations common people had supported guerilla action against the Japanese, while many of the elite had collaborated with the Japanese occupation forces.

The Philippine Commonwealth, a charter member of the United Nations when it was founded in 1945 was granted independence from the United States in 1946. It was then renamed the republic of the Philippines. Manuel Roxas was the country’s first president.

Hukbalahap Years

The Ruling Filipino Filipino elite was challenged after the war by a Communist-led armed peasant movement, the Hukbalahap (People’s Army Against Japan) or Huks. The Huks had originally been.. more..

The Philippines has a rich and multi-hued history.

Since the the olden times, the country engaged extensive trade with leading trading countries within the Asian economic sphere like India, China and Japan through barter, past modes of trade exchanges and direct vending.

 

In Philippine history, the present Filipino race came from different migrants of Malay descent from different parts of Asia who crossed the “ice bridges” during the last phases of the Ice Age and into the different plains of the Philippine Islands.

They were mostly animal hunters and gatherers. Little is known after these numerous treks into the Philippine peninsula until Ferdinand Magellan of Spain “rediscovered” the country and claimed it for Spain during the year 1521.

The Philippines under Spanish Colonial Rule

The Philippines was a prized territory (the sole spanish colony in Asia at that time) during Spain’s reign because of the country’s rich and diverse produce of spices. Miguel Lopez de Legaspi, in 1565, made the first permanent Spanish settlement in Cebu. The country’s colonial administration was then transferred to Manila during 1571 in which Spain’s authority was exercised. In the rural areas, the parish priests (friars) are the ones left as the representation of spanish authority.

Much of the Philippines’ traditions bear the resemblances of Spanish traditions and customs which include, cockfighting, classical music in western forms and, the most significant of all, the Christian religion. The Philippines is considered to be a Christian country in terms of number of followers to population ratio.

During the advent of the 19th century, a new form of social consciousness emerged from the Filipino people’s minds resulting from demands for reform in the different parts of the country. This change of perspective was sparked by the different writings of Dr. Jose Rizal and other foremost Filipino intellectuals and leaders which castigated Spain’s inefficiences and abuse in its rule. This led to the failed Filipino revolution against Spain in the late 1890s.

American Rule

Spain subsequently ceded the Philippines to the United States (see Spanish-American War) during the latter part of the 19th century. Thenafter, Emilio Aguinaldo, the first Philippine president led a new war against the new rulers. However, his efforts soon resulted to disappointment. For more than 10 years, the Philippines became a colony for the United States. Some improvements in the country resulted from US colonization of the Philippines, especially the education system.

Plans were made to grant the Philippines its independene. However, the World War in the Pacific brought upon by the Japanese Empire cause the demise of these plans. After World War II ended, territorial independence was soon granted to the Filipino people (see Philippine Independence).

Life After World War II

The Philippines paid heavily in death and destruction when the Japanese forces occupied the country from 1942 to 1945 during World War II’s history. Manila was plundered, and much of it was destroyed. Postwar reconstruction was complicated by deep splits in Philippine society. Social and economic inequalities had gone largely uncorrected – the country was plagued by problems of land tenancy, absentee ownership, and unequal taxation. Moreover, the nations common people had supported guerilla action against the Japanese, while many of the elite had collaborated with the Japanese occupation forces.

The Philippine Commonwealth, a charter member of the United Nations when it was founded in 1945 was granted independence from the United States in 1946. It was then renamed the republic of the Philippines. Manuel Roxas was the country’s first president.

Hukbalahap Years

The Ruling Filipino Filipino elite was challenged after the war by a Communist-led armed peasant movement, the Hukbalahap (People’s Army Against Japan) or Huks. The Huks had originally been.. more..

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